Shoulder Surgery

Dr. Raynor Explains Rotator Cuff Tears

In this video, Dr. Brett Raynor gives a brief description of shoulder rotator cuff tears.  He often uses diagrams in the clinic when explaining different conditions and treatment options, so he has created an animation for his patients to access as educational material.

Multidirectional Glenohumeral Instability is Amenable to Arthroscopic Pancapsular Capsulorrhaphy

A paper regarding the optimal management of multidirectional shoulder instability published by Dr. Raynor and Dr. Millett was in the news.

Patients with multidirectional instability of the shoulder experienced an effective and safe treatment with arthroscopic pancapsular capsulorrhaphy with suture anchors at middle-term follow-up in a cohort study.

In the study, multidirectional instability (MDI) was defined clinically as symptomatic instability in more than one direction, one of which was inferior. Surprisingly to the investigators, about 64% of the patients studied had labral detachments and these were also seen in patients with the more classic atraumatic onset of multidirectional glenohumeral instability, according to the findings.

“The most important finding is that arthroscopic pancapsular capsulorrhaphy [APC] can be effective for treating these patients with these complex instability patterns of the shoulder,” Peter J. Millett, MD, MSc, of the Steadman Clinic in Vail, Colo., told Orthopedics Today.

Full Article: Multidirectional Glenohumeral Instability is Amenable to Arthroscopic Pancapsular Capsulorrhaphy

Shoulder Instability Research Presented at Podium of the AOSSM Annual Meeting

Dr. Raynor presented his research on outcomes after pancapsular plication for multidirectional shoulder instability at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) national meeting in Orlando, Fl.

“Overall, patient satisfaction postoperative was nine out of 10,” Martin Brett Raynor, MD, said during his presentation at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. “The subgroup analysis looking at traumatic onset vs. atraumatic onset, the atraumatic group had overall lower postoperative scores than the traumatic group, but they still had significant improvement from preoperatively. The only exception was the SANE score..."

Read more of the press release by clicking here.